RAJKOT: Whenever doctors in private or government hospital declare a patient brain dead, is one of the first to rush there. She talks to the patient’s relatives with compassion and makes an to donate organs of the deceased.

In every brain-dead patient, Bhavna sees her own daughter Radhika, whose promising career as a cricketer and dancer came to a tragic end when she died at the age of just 16 in 2016. After doctors convinced Bhavna and her husband Mansukh, they donated Radhika’s liver, kidneys and heart. Talking to the bereaved families, she shows them Radhika’s photo on her mobile and tells them that their deceased near and dear one will remain alive eternally by giving life to others.

Tears start dropping from her eyes as she describes the pain of her teen daughter meeting a painful death. ““One day, I got a call that Radhika collapsed at home. I rushed home but by then she look okay and I started preparing to take her to doctor. But she collapsed in the room again and fell unconscious. Within few hours of being hospitalized, she slipped into coma. The doctor said there she had brain tumour which had ruptured and that blood coagulated in the veins of brain. It was not possible to treat and doctors declared her brain dead,” she said weeping. Hearing this, Bhavna and Mansukh were completely devastated.

Doctors then spoke to the couple and requested them to donate Radhika’s organs which could save lives of others. “It was an extremely tough moment. We were not in the frame of mind to decide anything but finally we took the call and donated her organs thinking that this was the best way to keep Radhika alive forever,” said Mansukh, who does a small-time job in the city.

The couple has a younger son Arjun but Bhavna had lost all the meaning of her life after Radhika’s death. However, things began to change after she met the doctors who had carried out Radhika’s organ donation. “The doctors and trustee of organ donation foundation Mittal Khetani asked me to help them in their work. After I started, I found a reason to live and it is now giving me immense satisfaction,” she told TOI. In the last two years, Bhavna has convinced relatives of 10 brain-dead persons for organ donation.

Mansukh too got involved and started helping her. “Generally, accident patients are brought to the hospital at night. Doctors call Bhavna even at odd hours and I immediately take her. Sometimes her counselling sessions with patients’ relatives continue till early mornings,” he said.

Bhavna admits that the job to persuade people in such difficult time is tough. Narrating one such case, she recalled: “A young boy suffered haemorrhage in an accident. He was the only brother of four sisters one of whom was getting married soon. Doctors called me at midnight to convince his relatives. When I made the first attempt, the boy’s grandmother straight away asked me to get out. My colleagues and I remained patient and did not take their outburst as insult. By 4am, the family was convinced that organ donation was a noble deed.”

“Bhavna makes passionate efforts to convince the relatives of brain-dead patients for organ donation. She herself has learnt this by undergoing immense pain. Persons from non-medical background can instill more confidence because some people wrongly believe that doctors could be earning hefty money through this activity,” said Dr Divyesh Viroja, transplant physician.

“Many people have a religious myth that they the person whose organs are donated will be reborn without those organs. In this kind of situation, we call Bhavna to convince such people,” said Dr Sankalp Vanzara, critical care specialist

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